What kind of plastic is peopoly resin

#1

What type of plastic is peopoly resin? Everyone that I discuss my new moai with who knows about 3d printing asks me how the part durability compares to some typical extruded plastic (PLA, ABS, PETG, etc). Is there any equivalence?

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#2

It is none of those!

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#3

Peopoly resin are methacrylate-based thermosetting plastics like most resins for SLA. I think epoxy-based formulations exist too but only for industrial systems (3D Systems, Stratasys).

This page from Formlabs gives a (slightly subjective) overview some of the material properties of methacrylate-based resins and how they compare to a thermoplastic FDM material (ABS).

Standard SLA material suffers from brittleness: for example 6 % elongation for Formlabs standard resin. But you probably made that experience yourself already when you dropped a print :smiley:

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#4

Exactly what I said!

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#5

Thanks! I do see some of these details in the poepoly wiki here. It seems I took my regular dosage of stupid pills this week as I didn’t even think to look it up until reading your post.

So… here’s the reason I’m asking. I’m an avid scuba diver, and am considering making some parts for my dive kit. I’d like to have some idea be fore I simply “try it” on how well the material will hold up to UV (sun) exposure and salt water.

In the FDM world, people decry PLA as not suitable for outdoor use because it is damaged by UV. However PLA has been fine in my experience when used on dive boats and underwater in the ocean. I’m hoping this stuff will hold up as well as PLA at least.

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#6

I would suggest checking out resins developed for dentistry and the medical field. Nextdent has a variety including some food safe materials

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#7

Also, you can print in one material, make a mold and inject with a material that you know is safe

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#8

SLA resins are UV activated. I have read anecdotes that it continues to cure in UV light and becomes brittle over time. However, different chemistries may age differently. As long as you aren’t making something mission-critical, e.g. a second stage housing or a facemask frame, it should be okay.

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