Thinking of buying first 3D printer- a PeoPoly Moai - Some questions please

#1

Hi everyone, I’m looking to get an SLA 3D printer and in my search I have discovered the PeoPoly Moai. I’ve never had a 3d printer before but I am looking to get my first one. I’m a Zbrush character sculptor so I want to print some cool 3d figures and busts which I have sculpted. I assume the Moai is up to that task? I’m very impressed from seeing all the videos on youtube and reviews from this printer and I have some questions if you don’t mind before I decide to take the plunge.

1 - what is the max size height and width of a 3d model you can print? I do a lot of sculpting in Zbrush and I would like to print some of my digital sculptures.

2 - Regarding detail, from what I have seen you can get some great detail with the Moai. I haven’t seen many larger figures printed on the Moai, would it give exceptional print detail on larger pieces in addition to smaller pieces? Like wrinkles in a face, veins on an arm, crisp facial features etc?

3 - Can a print be primed and painted and assembled as a final model for displaying? What kind of paints would be recommended?

4 - How strong is the normal grey resin? Would it be tough enough to be a displayed item with great strength or should I mold and cast the 3d print? Another words I don’t want to print a character model and have it fragile and break easily. I did see where People sells a harder resin though.

Thats about it for now, if anyone can help me with my questions I would greatly appreciate it! I want to primarily print character models with maximum detail and I’m hoping the Moai will be the perfect 3d printer for what I want to do.

Thanks!

John

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#2

See https://peopoly.net

  1. 130x130x180mm

  2. Yes, the detail doesn’t depend on size, just on what is in the model. Also, the detail from the Moai is much better than from a Form1/2 printer.

  3. Yes. Acrylic paints work well, but you probably want to apply some primer first (brush or spray, but don’t need filler primer like you do with FDM printers). There are facebook groups dedicated to printing gaming figures and models that will have more detailed suggestions.

  4. Not super fragile, but also not super impact resistant. I have other resins that are more fragile (like acrylic), and some that are more flexible and impact resistant (like ABS, urethane, or epoxy). The Peopoly gray should be fine for maquettes, but not for a child’s toy. If you want to sell the designs, I’d make a mold and cast it in urethane or epoxy.

You can also use third party resins, but we’re still testing a lot of them and dialing in the settings. There’s a spreadsheet posted in the forum with all the up to date known resins and settings for them.

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#3

Awesome, thanks so much for the answers to my questions. It all sounds great! I look forward to getting the Moai and start using it! It sounds like it will be perfect for my needs. :slight_smile:

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#5

I’d get my feet wet with a inexpensive filament printer first. Just to learn the ropes. Artists expect perfection out of the gate and “it aint going to happen” without knowing the basics.

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#6

FDM printing is harldy the same thing as SLA though. I have seen a lot of new users of other SLA machines ask for help because they couldn’t get good print, and mostly they were just trying to apply the same rules and concepts they learned for FDM printing.

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#7

Those rules would be “The Basics” How to slice, how to adapt your process for success, etc.

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#8

In that regard and for a lesser price than a Prusa Mk2, wouldn’t a cheap DLP/LCD printer be a good idea too ? These things are easily available for less than 500 bucks with a small build volume.

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#9

depends on the build size. An LCD/DLP has roughly half the build size of a moai. If that works for you, then totally go for it, but don’t get the sub $500 LCD printers, those are just a pain.

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